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Archive for the tag “Property manager”

Pending Home Sale On The Rise!

Source:  Carol Riordan www.HartfordCourant.com – HomeLife

 

Pending home sale for February were up significantly versus a year ago according to a study just released by the national Association of Realtors (NAR).

Their Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI)* showed an overall increase across the United States to an index of 96.5, a rise of 9.2 percent compared to February of 2011.  In the Northeast, the index rose 18.4 percent to 77.7.  The Midwest also posted large gains with a 19.0 percent increase to an index of 93.8.  There was an increase of 7.8 percent in the South to an index of 105.8 and a decrease in the West of 1.8 percent to an index of 99.3.

NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun predicted a strong buying season based on recent monthly PHSI increases.  He said, “We had a very good January, now we have a nine-percent increase in February figures.  These are implying that this buying season will be a quite decent year.”

The unseasonably warm weather has encouraged people to go out and look for properties.  Potential buyers are not just browsing, however, but shopping seriously for homes as indicated by a rise in realtor confidence.  “Realtors are looking at some of the qualitative factors,” said Yun.  “Whether or not people are returning on their open house visits; whether people are examining homes very carefully or just kicking the tires.”

Another indication of the real estate market’s recovery is declining shadow inventory which is measured by seriously delinquent mortgages and homes in foreclosure.  Shadow inventory reached a high in the last quarter of 2009, but has been steadily declining since then.  There has also been a decline in bank-owned properties and properties owned by the government through Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Federal Housing Administration.  In addition, visible inventory has reached its lowest level in the five years.  “So all three buckets of potential inventory…are declining and therefore, because it’s declining consistently, it’s implying that the market is able to absorb this inventory and it’s all moving in the right direction, “said Yun.

He noted that home sales have been essentially stable since 2009 and that the recent uptick in the PHSI is noteworthy.  “If activity is sustained near present levels, existing-home sales will see their best performance in five years,” Yun said.  “Based on all of the factors in the current market, that’s what we’re expecting with sales rising seven to 10 percent in 2012.”

*The PHSI is a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings.  The data reflects contracts, but not closings.  The index is based on a large national sample, typically representing about 20 percent of transactions for existing-home sales.  Information about NAR is available at www.realtor.org.

Visit www.BarberinoRealEstate.com for all your Connecticut Real Estate Home Selling and Buying needs.  Specializing in Condominium Property Management in CT, Leases and Sales. Go with the pro! Alan Barberino.

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The Board/Management Relationship – A Joint Effort

Source: By Hannah Fons, Manning Krull, Article Options www.NewEnglandCondo.com

ImageUnless they’re self-managed, most urban residential buildings employ

professional property managers to handle their books, bid out repair

jobs, hire contractors and deal with the day-to-day administrative

functions that few unit owners or trustees have the time (or desire) to

handle themselves. The property manager is a key player in a condo

building or HOA’s day-to-day functioning.

So how do managers and boards of trustees work together for the benefit of their building communities? As with most such relationships, it depends on the manager, the building and the expectations each has for the other. By clearly communicating roles, concerns and expectations, the management /trustee relationship can be a rewarding, functional partnership.

Put It in Writing

Every building community is different—and while certain aspects of running them are similar, there are bound to be points at which buildings differ. A good manager will adapt his or her approach to each building in his or her portfolio and find out exactly how that community wants to do things.

“Some boards like to be told every little thing,” says Mark Weisman, president of Boston’s Brownstone Real Estate, “and some don’t. Sometimes, a board will say, ‘Don’t call us unless the bill is over $500.’ Some don’t want to do anything themselves. They may not even want to take their trash out—they want us to pay the bills and keep the place clean and just send them a bill every month.”

Whatever your building’s preferences and expectations, it’s impossible for anybody to carry them out if they don’t know what those preferences and expectations are in the first place. To ensure that everybody’s on the same page, it’s wise to articulate expectations clearly and then commit them to print. In other words, put it in writing.

For example, if your trustees feel that the manager should be on-site at least one day a week to deal with building business, meet with residents and staff, and inspect the property, while the manager feels that one day every other week is adequate, clearly there will be friction unless a compromise is met. By clearly stating your expectations to your manager, then allowing them to explain their own obligations and concerns to you, working through to a mutually agreeable solution and then putting that solution in writing, the potential for misunderstanding is greatly reduced.

It’s also important to have things in writing for the benefit of non-trustee residents. If a tear sheet or informational memo is available outlining exactly when management will be on-site, whom to contact in case of an emergency and the schedules for things like trash collection and snow removal, residents will more likely adhere to house rules and regulations. Better still, they may be less likely to complain about lack of communication from trustees/management.

Another benefit of spelling out roles and expectations is that your trustees will have a ready-made checklist against which to compare your management company’s performance. Should your building ever opt to change companies, you won’t have to reinvent the wheel with the new managers. You can simply present them with a copy, so everyone understands what’s expected and there are no surprises for either party.

Reaching a joint agreement about what your building wants in a manager—and what your property manager can reasonably provide—is one of the most important elements of the trustee/manager relationship. With clearly defined expectations, both sides of the relationship can know where they stand and have a good idea of whether or not the relationship itself is working.

Your Manager Works for You

It’s sometimes easy for a group of trustees to forget that their building’s manager is really their employee—and that they, the board, are the ones charged with making the final decisions about how to run the building. Given that most trustees are volunteers, and not professionals in the real estate industry, informed input from the management is vital—but it’s just that: input. The trustees have the final word in the decisions that affect the building community.

To that end, boards and managers must both commit to an agenda for meetings—and an action plan for afterwards—and to do their part to carry out that action plan once the meeting adjourns. That means establishing deadlines for specific tasks, delegating responsibilities fairly and practically and following up to make sure everything that needs doing has been done.

When it comes to handling problems and complaints within the building, trustees and managers must determine who will receive complaints and how they will then be acted upon. Whether it’s a complaint committee, a phone hotline, or simply a designated go-to person for managing hot-button issues, the important thing is to establish a system and adhere to it consistently.

“I like to get an e-mail list going,” says Weisman, “so I can get in touch with everybody all at once. I know who the owners are, the tenants, the mortgagees.”

“You need to be on top of everything,” agrees Ed Lyon, owner of Preservation Properties in Newton. “As a manager, you need to set the pace for the agenda. You need to be one or two steps ahead of the trustees, the tenants and the boards.”

A good manager with years of experience can be invaluable when it comes to this part of building administration by divvying up assignments and helping individual trustees take on only as much as they can reasonably accomplish in the given span of time. It’s also up to the manager to check in periodically with committee members and other trustees to make sure the projects and initiatives decided upon at the meeting are coming along on schedule. While managers are working for their boards and buildings, it’s their experience and cumulative wisdom that enables even the greenest trustees to hit the ground running and conduct their community business smoothly.

For questions, quotes, information about Condominium Property Management in Connecticut, feel free to call

 Alan Barberino Real Estate, LLC at 203-265-7534 or visit our web site at www.BarberinoRealEstate.com

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